Reality Check

Do not use your browser's back button or you will lose your answers.
How to use this feature: You can edit your location and household information on the left. Enter cost information in the boxes or use the sliders to select a desired option.There are 12 categories and a summary is listed on the left. You can edit your answers before completing the assessment.

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$0 Total Monthly Cost
Housing
Utilities
Transportation
Food
Clothes
Entertainment
Personal
Healthcare
Education
Miscellaneous
Saving
Taxes

Reality Check

Make budget choices and get a summary of state or county costs in 12 major expense categories. Link to occupations that pay salaries that match your life choices.

GET STARTED

Make budget choices and get a summary of state or county costs in 12 major expense categories. Link to occupations that pay salaries that match your life choices.

 

Estimated completion time: 5 - 10 minutes.

About Reality Check

Reality Check from the North Carolina Department of Commerce is a fun, new online tool designed to estimate the income necessary to support your desired lifestyle. State where you’d like to live in North Carolina and how you spend your money. From there, you’ll be directed to jobs that meet your financial needs.

This customized cost estimate includes expenses like:

 

 

Housing

Housing

  • Own or rent?
  • Cable?
  • Cell phone?
  • Utilities?
Transportation

Transportation

  • Type of vehicle?
  • Car payment?
  • Walk, bike, bus?
Lifestyle

Lifestyle

  • Expensive tastes?
  • Thrifty shopper?
  • Shows, events?
  • Travel?
Other

Other

  • Healthcare?
  • Student loans?
  • Pets?
  • Savings?

Where do you want to live?

We were unable to match your search with a city, county or zip code. Please verify the search or select the desired location on the map to the right.
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Choose by clicking on a location or area on the map:
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/Month
Housing
What kind of place will you live in? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your housing will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
âś”
Own my own home
(house, townhouse, condo)
housing

Own affordable home

âś”
Rent
(apartment, townhome, house)
housing

Rent affordable home

âś”
Live with parents or friends
housing

Live with parents or friends

/Month
Utilities
What home services will you need? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your utilities will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
/Month
Transportation
How will you get around? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your transportation will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
âś”
Buy a new or used car with a car loan
transportation

Low cost car with payment

âś”
Use a car that's already paid for
transportation

Use a car that's already paid for

âś”
Walk, bike, public transportation
transportation

Walk, bike, public transportation

/Month
Food
How expensive are your tastes? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your food will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
âś”
Food

I eat cheaply

/Month
Clothes
How much do you value what you wear? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your clothes will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
âś”
clothes

I have average tastes and expenses

/Month
Entertainment
How much do you want to have to spend on gadgets and entertainment? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your gadgets and entertainment will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.

 

âś”
entertainment

I am not interested in saving now.

/Month
Personal
How much do you want to have to spend on personal items and household goods? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your personal items will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
âś”
personal

I'm thrifty

/Month
Healthcare
How much will you have to pay for health and medical expenses? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your health care will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
/Month
Education
Do you expect to have student loans to repay? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your student loans will cost each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
/Month
Miscellaneous
Do you plan to have pets or children? Select and if your amount is different from the amount shown, enter it in the Monthly Cost box below
/Month
Savings
What percent of your paycheck do you plan on saving each month for big purchases, emergencies, and retirement? Click on the statement below that best describes you or, if you know how much your savings will be each month, enter that amount in the Monthly Cost box below.
âś”
saving

I have average tastes and expenses.

/Month
Taxes
Enjoy traveling on interstates and state highways? Appreciate police officers or EMTs showing up when you have an emergency? What about those water and sewer pipes? Most of us groan about taxes, but they do pay for essential resources and services in our communities. This item estimates your income-based tax payments and shows why your take-home pay looks different from your gross income.

My Household Expense Contribution (100%)

Interest Finder
Webforms
Do not use your browser's back button or you will lose your answers.
John Holland suggested that viewing the Interest Areas on a hexagon can help people understand how their interests overlap or how they may be distinctly different. You must answer all questions to receive a result.

Interest Finder Info

Long Version

What kind of person are you? Are you Artistic? Social? Realistic?
Answer a few questions to identify your personality type. Either version will give you the same results.

Estimated completion time: the Short Version takes 5 - 10 minutes and the Long Version takes 10 - 20 minutes.

Holland Codes

John Holland suggested that viewing the Interest Areas on a hexagon can help people understand how their interests overlap or how they may be distinctly different. Interests that are most similar are beside each other on the hexagon (e.g., Social, Enterprising, and Conventional). On the other hand, interests across the hexagon from each other (e.g., Conventional and Artistic) are least likely to have similarities. Sometimes people’s combined interests are opposite from or not adjacent to each other. In this case, people sometimes choose to focus on the most different interest as a hobby or to find a unique work setting that merges their interests.

Holland Hexagon

 

Career Interest Types

The Interest Finder measures interests in each of the six Holland RIASEC types.* This section provides definitions for each of the six types. Each definition includes examples of activities that individuals with that interest type like to perform, as well as examples of famous people whose field of work matches the interest type.

 Realistic — The "Doers"

People with Realistic interests like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They enjoy dealing with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. They often enjoy outside work. Often people with Realistic interests do not like occupations that mainly involve doing paperwork or working closely with others. Famous realists: TV carpenter Norm Abram, snowboarder Chloe Kim, and celebrity mechanic Jesse James.

 Investigative — The "Thinkers"

People with Investigative interests like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking more than with physical activity. They prefer to search for facts and figure out problems mentally rather than to persuade or lead people. Prominent investigators: astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, primatologist Jane Goodall, mathematician/computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper, and theoretical physicist Steven Hawking.

 Artistic — The "Creators"

People with Artistic interests like work activities that deal with the artistic side of things, such as forms, designs, and patterns. They like self-expression in their work. They prefer settings where work can be done without following a clear set of rules. Well-known artists: painter/sculptor Leonardo da Vinci, actress Halle Berry, writer J.K. Rowling, and singers Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett.

 Social — The "Helpers"

People with Social interests like work activities that assist others and promote learning and personal development. They prefer to communicate more than to work with objects, machines, or data. They like to teach, give advice, help, or otherwise be of service to people. Famous helpers: educator Booker T. Washington, mental health care reformer Dorothea Dix, TV psychologist Phil McGraw, and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

 Enterprising — The "Persuaders"

People with Enterprising interests like work activities that have to do with starting up and carrying out projects, especially business ventures. They like persuading and leading people and making decisions. They enjoy taking risks for profit. These people prefer action rather than thought. Prominent persuaders: TV mogul Oprah Winfrey, business magnate Jeff Bezos, and entrepreneur Elon Musk.

 Conventional — The "Organizers"

People with Conventional interests follow procedures and maintain accurate written and numerical business records. They prefer working in structured settings where roles and tasks are clearly defined. Well-known organizers: businessman J.C. Penney, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, and professional organizer Alejandra Costello.

* The O*NET Interest Finder is compatible with Holland's (1985a) Theory of Vocational Personality, one of the most widely accepted approaches to vocational choice. Information for Interest Areas is extracted from the O*NET Career Exploration Tools owned by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Training Administration (DOL/ETA). All O*NET Assessment/Counseling Tools are copyrighted. O*NET is a trademark of DOL/ETA.

Mark whether you think you might like performing the following activities.

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Holland Codes

John Holland suggested that viewing the Interest Areas on a hexagon can help people understand how their interests overlap or how they may be distinctly different. Interests that are most similar are beside each other on the hexagon (e.g., Social, Enterprising, and Conventional). On the other hand, interests across the hexagon from each other (e.g., Conventional and Artistic) are least likely to have similarities. Sometimes people’s combined interests are opposite from or not adjacent to each other. In this case, people sometimes choose to focus on the most different interest as a hobby or to find a unique work setting that merges their interests.

Holland Hexagon

 

Career Interest Types

The Interest Finder measures interests in each of the six Holland RIASEC types.* This section provides definitions for each of the six types. Each definition includes examples of activities that individuals with that interest type like to perform, as well as examples of famous people whose field of work matches the interest type.

 Realistic — The "Doers"

People with Realistic interests like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They enjoy dealing with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. They often enjoy outside work. Often people with Realistic interests do not like occupations that mainly involve doing paperwork or working closely with others. Famous realists: TV carpenter Norm Abram, snowboarder Chloe Kim, and celebrity mechanic Jesse James.

 Investigative — The "Thinkers"

People with Investigative interests like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking more than with physical activity. They prefer to search for facts and figure out problems mentally rather than to persuade or lead people. Prominent investigators: astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, primatologist Jane Goodall, mathematician/computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper, and theoretical physicist Steven Hawking.

 Artistic — The "Creators"

People with Artistic interests like work activities that deal with the artistic side of things, such as forms, designs, and patterns. They like self-expression in their work. They prefer settings where work can be done without following a clear set of rules. Well-known artists: painter/sculptor Leonardo da Vinci, actress Halle Berry, writer J.K. Rowling, and singers Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett.

 Social — The "Helpers"

People with Social interests like work activities that assist others and promote learning and personal development. They prefer to communicate more than to work with objects, machines, or data. They like to teach, give advice, help, or otherwise be of service to people. Famous helpers: educator Booker T. Washington, mental health care reformer Dorothea Dix, TV psychologist Phil McGraw, and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

 Enterprising — The "Persuaders"

People with Enterprising interests like work activities that have to do with starting up and carrying out projects, especially business ventures. They like persuading and leading people and making decisions. They enjoy taking risks for profit. These people prefer action rather than thought. Prominent persuaders: TV mogul Oprah Winfrey, business magnate Jeff Bezos, and entrepreneur Elon Musk.

 Conventional — The "Organizers"

People with Conventional interests follow procedures and maintain accurate written and numerical business records. They prefer working in structured settings where roles and tasks are clearly defined. Well-known organizers: businessman J.C. Penney, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, and professional organizer Alejandra Costello.

* The O*NET Interest Finder is compatible with Holland's (1985a) Theory of Vocational Personality, one of the most widely accepted approaches to vocational choice. Information for Interest Areas is extracted from the O*NET Career Exploration Tools owned by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Training Administration (DOL/ETA). All O*NET Assessment/Counseling Tools are copyrighted. O*NET is a trademark of DOL/ETA.

Interest Finder
Webforms
Do not use your browser's back button or you will lose your answers.
John Holland suggested that viewing the Interest Areas on a hexagon can help people understand how their interests overlap or how they may be distinctly different. You must answer all questions to receive a result.

Interest Profiler Info

Mini Interest Profiler

How much will you need to earn in the future?

Really check is here to help!

GET STARTED

Mark whether you think you might like performing the following activities.

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Career Interest Types

The Interest Profiler measures interests in each of the six Holland RIASEC types.* This section provides definitions for each of the six types. Each definition includes examples of activities that individuals with that interest type like to perform, as well as examples of famous people whose field of work matches the interest type.

Realistic — The "Doers"

People with Realistic interests like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They enjoy dealing with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. They often enjoy outside work. Often people with Realistic interests do not like occupations that mainly involve doing paperwork or working closely with others. Famous realists: TV carpenter Norm Abram, snowboarder Chloe Kim, and celebrity mechanic Jesse James.

Investigative — The "Thinkers"

People with Investigative interests like work activities that have to do with ideas and thinking more than with physical activity. They prefer to search for facts and figure out problems mentally rather than to persuade or lead people. Prominent investigators: astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, primatologist Jane Goodall, mathematician/computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper, and theoretical physicist Steven Hawking.

Artistic — The "Creators"

People with Artistic interests like work activities that deal with the artistic side of things, such as forms, designs, and patterns. They like self-expression in their work. They prefer settings where work can be done without following a clear set of rules. Well-known artists: painter/sculptor Leonardo da Vinci, actress Halle Berry, writer J.K. Rowling, and singers Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett.

Social — The "Helpers"

People with Social interests like work activities that assist others and promote learning and personal development. They prefer to communicate more than to work with objects, machines, or data. They like to teach, give advice, help, or otherwise be of service to people. Famous helpers: educator Booker T. Washington, mental health care reformer Dorothea Dix, TV psychologist Phil McGraw, and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

Enterprising — The "Persuaders"

People with Enterprising interests like work activities that have to do with starting up and carrying out projects, especially business ventures. They like persuading and leading people and making decisions. They enjoy taking risks for profit. These people prefer action rather than thought. Prominent persuaders: TV mogul Oprah Winfrey, business magnate Jeff Bezos, and entrepreneur Elon Musk.

Conventional — The "Organizers"

People with Conventional interests follow procedures and maintain accurate written and numerical business records. They prefer working in structured settings where roles and tasks are clearly defined. Well-known organizers: businessman J.C. Penney, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, and professional organizer Alejandra Costello.

* The O*NET Interest Profiler is compatible with Holland's (1985a) Theory of Vocational Personality, one of the most widely accepted approaches to vocational choice. Information for Interest Areas is extracted from the O*NET Career Exploration Tools owned by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Training Administration (DOL/ETA). All O*NET Assessment/Counseling Tools are copyrighted. O*NET is a trademark of DOL/ETA.


Holland Codes

John Holland suggested that viewing the Interest Areas on a hexagon can help people understand how their interests overlap or how they may be distinctly different. Interests that are most similar are beside each other on the hexagon (e.g., Social, Enterprising, and Conventional). On the other hand, interests across the hexagon from each other (e.g., Conventional and Artistic) are least likely to have similarities. Sometimes people’s combined interests are opposite from or not adjacent to each other. In this case, people sometimes choose to focus on the most different interest as a hobby or to find a unique work setting that merges their interests.

Holland Code hexagon diagram

Other ways to explore your own characteristics:

Interests are only one part of who you are, so check out the following sites to find other ways to explore your own characteristics and identify other qualities that connect with careers that you may choose.

Interests

Personality Type

Abilities & Aptitudes

girl deciding on a career

Reality_Check

Reality Check is an online tool designed to estimate the income necessary to support your desired lifestyle. State where you’d like to live in North Carolina and how you spend your money. From there, you’ll be directed to jobs that meet your financial needs.

 
CS-Do-Not-Change-For-Internal-Use
Webforms

Career Cluster Match

Uncover which Career Clusters match your combination of work, skill, and academic interests.

GET STARTED

Uncover which Career Clusters match your combination of work, skill, and academic interests.

Estimated completion time: 10 - 20 minutes.

About Career Cluster Match

The National Career Clusters Framework identifies 16 career clusters and related career pathways that are designed to grow career awareness and exploration. Career Clusters are groups of occupations in the same field of work that require similar skills. Each cluster contains several smaller groups called career Pathways that connect to educational programs, industries, and jobs. While a Career Cluster paints a broad picture of a group of occupations, a Pathway helps you focus on and develop a clear, more informed, educational plan over time.

The Career Cluster Match was adapted and produced with permission from the Career Academic Connections Division of the Oklahoma Department of Career Tech. This survey does not make any claims of statistical reliability and has not been normed. It is intended for use as a guidance tool to generate discussion regarding careers and is valid for that purpose.

 

Image Of Agriculture, Food Natural Resources

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Architecture Construction

Architecture & Construction

Image Of Arts, A/V Technology Communications

Arts, A/V Technology & Communications

Image Of Business Management Administration

Business Management & Administration

Image Of Education Training

Education & Training

Image Of Finance

Finance

Image Of Government Public Administration

Government & Public Administration

Image Of Health Science

Health Science

Image Of Hospitality Tourism

Hospitality & Tourism

Human Services

Human Services

Information Technology

Information Technology

Law, Public Safety, Corrections

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Marketing

Marketing

Science, Technology, Engineering

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Transportation, Distribution

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

About Career Cluster Match

The National Career Clusters Framework identifies 16 career clusters and related career pathways that are designed to grow career awareness and exploration. Career Clusters are groups of occupations in the same field of work that require similar skills. Each cluster contains several smaller groups called career Pathways that connect to educational programs, industries, and jobs. While a Career Cluster paints a broad picture of a group of occupations, a Pathway helps you focus on and develop a clear, more informed, educational plan over time.

The Career Cluster Survey was adapted and produced with permission from the Career Academic Connections Division of the Oklahoma Department of Career Tech. This survey does not make any claims of statistical reliability and has not been normed. It is intended for use as a guidance tool to generate discussion regarding careers and is valid for that purpose.

 

Image Of Agriculture, Food Natural Resources

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Architecture Construction

Architecture & Construction

Image Of Arts, A/V Technology Communications

Arts, A/V Technology & Communications

Image Of Business Management Administration

Business Management & Administration

Image Of Education Training

Education & Training

Image Of Finance

Finance

Image Of Government Public Administration

Government & Public Administration

Image Of Health Science

Health Science

Image Of Hospitality Tourism

Hospitality & Tourism

Human Services

Human Services

Information Technology

Information Technology

Law, Public Safety, Corrections

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Marketing

Marketing

Science, Technology, Engineering

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Transportation, Distribution

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

Be Your Own Boss
Webforms
Do not use your browser's back button or you will lose your answers.
Becoming an entrepreneur is not for everyone. In business, there are no guarantees. There is simply no way to eliminate all of the risks. It takes a special person with a strong commitment and specific skills to be successful as an entrepreneur. Are you ready to start your own business? Use the Readiness Assessment Guide to better understand how prepared you are. The Assessment Guide has twenty five questions. Your responses will be evaluated at completion of the questions.
Small Business/Entrepreneur Readiness SURVEY

GET STARTED

See if you're ready to start your dream business. This short survey is designed to test your readiness by asking about the key characteristics, conditions, qualities, and skills found in successful entrepreneurs.

Estimated completion time: 5 - 10 minutes.
 

General

1. Do you think you are ready to start a business?
2. Do you have support for your business from family and friends?
3. Have you ever worked in a business similar to what you are starting?
4. Would people that know you say you are entrepreneurial?
5. Have you ever taken a small business course or seminar?

Personal Characteristics

1. Are you a leader?
2. Do you like to make your own decisions?
3. Do others turn to you for help in making decisions?
4. Do you enjoy competition?
5. Do you have will power and self discipline?
6. Do you plan ahead?
7. Do you like people?
8. Do you get along with others?
9. Would people that know you say you are outgoing?

Personal Conditions

1. Are you aware that running your own business may require working more than 12 hours a day, six days a week and maybe Sundays and holidays?
2. Do you have the physical stamina to handle a “self-employed” workload and schedule?
3. Do you have the emotional strength to deal effectively with pressure?
4. Are you prepared, if needed, to temporarily lower your standard of living until your business is firmly established?
5. Are you prepared to lose a portion of your savings?

Skills And Experience

1. Do you know what basic skills you will need in order to have a successful business?
2. Do you possess those skills?
3. Do you feel comfortable using a computer?
4. Have you ever worked in a managerial or supervisory capacity?
5. Do you think you can be comfortable hiring, disciplining and delegating tasks to employees?
6. If you discover you do not have the basic skills needed for your business, will you be willing to delay your plans until you have acquired the necessary skills?
Skills Matcher
Webforms

Ready to jumpstart, change, or advance on your career path? Tell us about your skills and we'll show you career options that might be a good fit.

Skills Matcher helps you identify careers that match your skills. You answer 40 questions to rate your level in a range of skills. Then you see a list of careers that are good matches for your unique set of skills. You can then explore the careers on your list of matches.

Estimated completion time: 10 - 20 minutes.

Select your skill level

Do not use your browser's back button or you will lose your answers.
Use the examples provided to help choose your skill levels. Think about whether you have done the example activity, or something like it in your own field.

1. How much do you know about business planning and leadership?
Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
q1_skill_level
2. How much do you know about plant, animal and cell functions?
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
q2_skill_level
3. How well can you coordinate moving your arms, legs, and torso together?
Moving your arms, legs, and mid-section together while your whole body is moving.
q3_skill_level
4. How much do you know about construction materials, methods, and tools?
Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
q4_skill_level
5. How well do you know chemistry?
Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
q5_skill_level
6. How much do you know about administrative tasks and processes?
Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
q6_skill_level
7. How good are you at figuring out the best way to solve a problem?
Noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it.
q7_skill_level
8. How effective are you at using electronic equipment?
Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
q8_skill_level
9. How well do you know how to handle customer needs and resolve service problems?
Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
q9_skill_level
10. How well do you know banking and financial systems?
Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
q10_skill_level
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11. How well do you know the theory and techniques of an art form such as music, painting, drama, or other?
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
q11_skill_level
12. How well do you know a foreign language?
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
q12_skill_level
13. How good are you at understanding how to help people?
Looking for ways to help people.
q13_skill_level
14. Teaching people how to do something.
Teaching people how to do something.
q14_skill_level
15. What level of financial decision-maker are you?
Making spending decisions and keeping track of what is spent.
q15_skill_level
16. What is your level of math skill?
Using math to solve problems.
q16_skill_level
17. How well can you design, use, repair, and maintain machines?
Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance
q17_skill_level
18. How well do you know how to provide health care?
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
q18_skill_level
19. How good is your memory?
Remembering words, numbers, pictures, or steps.
q19_skill_level
20. How well can you assess your or others’ work?
Keeping track of how well people and/or groups are doing in order to make improvements.
q20_skill_level
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Next
21. How well do you persuade others to see different points of view or compromise?
Bringing people together to solve differences.
q21_skill_level
22. How well can you analyze needs and requirements, then make a plan that meets them?
Figuring out what a product or service needs to be able to do.
q22_skill_level
23. How well do you know the principles and procedures for recruiting, hiring, and training employees?
Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
q23_skill_level
24. How well can you oversee manufacturing and distribution processes?
Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
q24_skill_level
25. How well can you write computer programs?
Writing computer programs.
q25_skill_level
26. How well do you know the methods of research, assessment, and treatment of human behavior?
Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
q26_skill_level
27. How well do you know the equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies used to promote security operations?
Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
q27_skill_level
28. How well can you develop and use testing processes?
Testing how well a product or service works.
q28_skill_level
29. How well can you repair machines or systems using the needed tools?
Repairing machines or systems using the right tools.
q29_skill_level
30. How well can you perform marketing strategies and tactics?
Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
q30_skill_level
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Next
31. How well can you use scientific rules and methods to solve problems?
Using scientific rules and strategies to solve problems.
q31_skill_level
32. How well do you know the theories of group behavior, societal trends and influences, and human culture?
Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
q32_skill_level
33. How well do you convey information when you speak?
Talking to others.
q33_skill_level
34. How well can you analyze systems?
Figuring out how a system should work and how changes in the future will affect it.
q34_skill_level
35. How well do you know the principles and methods of instruction?
Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
q35_skill_level
36. How well do you understand telecom systems?
Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
q36_skill_level
37. How well do you know the principles and methods used in counseling?
Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
q37_skill_level
38. How well do you manage your and others' time?
Managing your time and the time of other people.
q38_skill_level
39. How well can you identify and fix problems in machines or technology?
Figuring out what is causing equipment, machines, wiring, or computer programs to not work.
q39_skill_level
40. How well does your writing effectively communicate to an audience's particular need?
Writing things for co-workers or customers.
q40_skill_level
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Work Values Sorter
Webforms

Work Value

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This assessment can help you learn more about your work values and can help you decide what is important to you in a job.It does this by asking you to rank different aspects of work that represent six important work values.Knowing your work values can help you decide what kinds of jobs and careers you might want to explore. When you complete the assessment, you will get scores for six work values.

These scores show how important each of the work values is to you. You can explore occupations that are linked with your work values; the more a job agrees with your work values, the more likely you are to be satisfied in that job.

Estimate completion time: 10 - 20 minutes.

Do not use your browser's back button or you will lose your answers.
Sort and prioritize your Work Values by dragging and dropping each card into a spot that best matches how important it is for you to have a job like the one described on the card.

"In my ideal job it is important that..."

20/20 Cards remaining


Drag and drop below

    1. Least Valued 4 Open

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    2. Less Valued 4 Open

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    3. Somewhat Valued 4 Open

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    4. More Valued 4 Open

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    5. Most Valued 4 Open

    Drag and drop here

Put exactly 4 cards in each column, each in its own spot. The order within each column does not matter.